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ARTICLES

 

Managing Food Allergies in Your Classroom /
Preparing Foods Safely


Managing Food Allergies in Your Classroom


  • Ask parents to provide you with complete information about the allergy, e.g., foods to avoid, cross-sensitivities, treatment, home and work numbers. 
  • Discuss food allergies with the class and stress its seriousness. Invite a guest from the Health Unit or Allergy Asthma Information Association to speak to the children. 
  • Inform other parents about this health issue too. Ask for their cooperation in reinforcing class food rules with their children. 
  • Consider banning specific foods from the classroom if children have severe food allergies. They could react to very small quantities in the air, when someone nearby is eating the food or when a jar of the food is open close by. 
  • Ask the children not to share lunches or trade snacks. 
  • Discourage allergic children from trying foods they are unsure of. 
  • When foods are served in the classroom, choose ones that are plain and readily identified such as fruits and vegetables. It may be safest not to plan class celebrations around food. 
  • If you do ask parents to donate foods for special occasions, make sure they attach a complete list of ingredients. 
  • Avoid using problem foods in arts and crafts activities eg., peanut butter in play dough and suet balls. 
  • Know where the child's EpiPen or Anakit is located and how to administer it. The Public Health Nurse at your school can provide training sessions for teachers. 

  • Developed by the staff at Middlesex-London Health Unit and may be reproduced without permission provided that Middlesex-London Health Unit is properly acknowledged as the source. 1993 

     
     
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    Preparing Foods Safely


    Proper food handling can prevent food allergy reactions and food poisoning. 

    • Be aware of children who have food allergies and take extra care in preparing and handling food for them. 
    • Anyone who prepares food should wash their hands before handling foods, and after handling raw meats, fish or poultry. 
    • Advise your children to wash their hands well before and after eating. 
    • Clean your work surfaces and cooking equipment thoroughly with hot, soapy water. 
    • Use separate cooking equipment for foods being prepared for children with food allergies. 
    • Read food labels on package products carefully to identify problem ingredients. 
    • Keep hot foods hot (above 140 deg F/60 deg C) and cold foods cold (below 40 deg F/5 deg C). 
    • Refrigerate or throw out any leftovers right after meals are eaten. 
    • Discourage children with allergies from trying foods they are unsure of. 
    • In the clean-up, disinfect work surfaces and cooking equipment by rinsing them with a mixture of 15 mL bleach in 1 L water. 

    Developed by the staff at Middlesex-London Health Unit and may be reproduced without permission provided that Middlesex-London Health Unit is properly acknowledged as the source. 1993 


Terms of Use: The information on this site does not constitute medical advice and is for your general information only. We cannot be held responsible for anything you could possibly do or say because of information on this site.   Consult your family physician or allergist for specific questions or concerns. 


 

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